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Hunterbob
Spoon wrote:
Fork wrote:
Elon Musk is pretty vocal about it, saying that people are running "the dumbest experiment in history" by continuing to burn fossil fuels and is doing something about it - making money

You don't get to be worth 13 billion dollars by caring about the environment. You get there by exploiting the people that do care about the environment and will justify paying extra to think they're helping.

This.

Where does the electricity come from? Probably fossil fuel plants that supply the majority of power grids worldwide. And the batteries? Oh yeah, don't worry about the disposal and creation of such poisonous things, the positive thing is to believe in electric cars.
Fork
Hunterbob wrote:
Spoon wrote:
Fork wrote:
Elon Musk is pretty vocal about it, saying that people are running "the dumbest experiment in history" by continuing to burn fossil fuels and is doing something about it - making money

You don't get to be worth 13 billion dollars by caring about the environment. You get there by exploiting the people that do care about the environment and will justify paying extra to think they're helping.

This.

Where does the electricity come from? Probably fossil fuel plants that supply the majority of power grids worldwide. And the batteries? Oh yeah, don't worry about the disposal and creation of such poisonous things, the positive thing is to believe in electric cars.


Thought it was covered in the article but it must have been this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qi4U-Q2Ca_A

Pretty much [paraphrased] burning fossil fuels in power plans for electricity then distributing it and charging our cars with it, is still much more efficient and better in terms of byproduct than burning fossil fuels in our cars.
Hunterbob
Fork wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Spoon wrote:
Fork wrote:
Elon Musk is pretty vocal about it, saying that people are running "the dumbest experiment in history" by continuing to burn fossil fuels and is doing something about it - making money

You don't get to be worth 13 billion dollars by caring about the environment. You get there by exploiting the people that do care about the environment and will justify paying extra to think they're helping.

This.

Where does the electricity come from? Probably fossil fuel plants that supply the majority of power grids worldwide. And the batteries? Oh yeah, don't worry about the disposal and creation of such poisonous things, the positive thing is to believe in electric cars.


Thought it was covered in the article but it must have been this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qi4U-Q2Ca_A

Pretty much [paraphrased] burning fossil fuels in power plans for electricity then distributing it and charging our cars with it, is still much more efficient and better in terms of byproduct than burning fossil fuels in our cars.

For the record, I didn't read the article and that's just been a niggling thought since the introduction of electric cars. Sure it'll be more efficient, but it's still using a non-renewable source. I'm all for developing better solar and wind technologies, but hydro is a tough one, as it destroys eco-systems and even villages to build a dam.

Hydrogen research needs to be a thing, because we do have an abundance of water, and desalination is already a thing, to create clean water. But I guess it's too energy intensive at this stage, considering we haven't harnessed hydrogen fission/fusion.
Fork
I encourage you to watch that video I linked, he's very well spoken and informative.

Yes, its probably hype mongering and biased opinions, but he couldn't outright lie about facts so at least some of it would have merit.
Darkshaunz
Australian Politics

Yesterday, many things happened and I struggled to keep up with it all. I am now writing about it because it was quite interesting, exciting, and mainly because a bunch of people who thought their boss was going to win a contest, got really upset when he didn't. Also, internet Australians lost their collective minds when things were actually happening that they wished happened. Personally, I don't think Australia has a stable government, not with this revolving door policy of politicians. You guys could learn a thing or two from Malaysia about political stability, where the same party has been in power for over half a century, and our longest-serving PM rul-governed us benevolently for over two decades.

Tony Abbott, is a man so widely ridiculed by his own nation that to this day, I actually still wonder how he managed to get voted in. People keep telling me that it's because the alternative was a party that was a clusterfuck of backstabbing and disunity. Okay, fair enough, I suppose. Then yesterday, it turns out that this lot is not any better than the other guys people didn't vote for on purpose. Shit, it must be terrible to be a voter right now, because you guys may now have to vote for other parties not affiliated with the big two. This is a terrifying prospect, and one that I can relate to, because I too have never had to consider voting for another party (and perhaps never will). As a constituent and global citizen, I empathize with all of you. Since I never lived through what has been described to me, "a tremendous idiot running a clown show", I did feel sad for Tony Abbott when he lost his job in the way that he did. No matter how incompetent he was, I am sure he deserves a bit of a hug - because fifty-four stab wounds to the back must have surely caused permanent damage. It's also clear that he achieved important milestones such as stopping the boats - something that is perhaps not so difficult considering that Australia has one of the best, and most advanced surface fleets and aerial maritime surveillance doctrines in the Oceanic region.

Joe Hockey, is (was?) your treasurer, and I watched his brief press conference before "Shit went down in a nondescript room with a ballot box". My impression of him was that he was a very unhappy miserable person. Which is weird, because I saw a picture linked to him on Mumble one night and it was him laughing with a big fat cigar in one hand. I thought he was a bubbly, and wealthy official of the Mad Max lands. If the treasurer could kick back with a cuban in one hand wearing nice shades, then I suppose Australia is doing pretty good financially. This is what we've been told here anyway, so I was puzzled as to why this presently wealthy man in charge of the coffers of the land could appear so destitute and distressed. I later found out that he fumbled the national budget, but in a way that ensured that he could keep smoking cubans whilst hundreds of thousands of Australians remained unemployed, or worked under new arrangements which sucked dicks. Oops. Also a bunch of ministers spoke, and I have no idea who they were - but I knew they were soon going to audition as extras for the next season of The Walking Dead.

Malcolm Turnbull, the man who would become the new Prime Minister of Australia used to be your communications minister. Unfortunately, it would seem that he blundered horribly with the NBN program, but apparently Tony Abbott is so bad that even fucking up the internet wasn't big enough a sin to be punished for. The most striking quality of Malcolm Turnbull to me is that he possesses a great 1930s radio announcer voice, or at the very least - the sort of voice you want commentating the Melbourne Cup. I could listen to him talk about why Fiber To The Node is the superior, faster version of the NBN all day. Underneath that smooth, buttery and eloquent oratory competency, lies a political strategist that is formidable. According to my research (google), he was unseated as the coalition leader by Tony Abbott many moons ago. It must be hard for Malcolm Turnbull to get that taste of metallic iron out of his mouth at the swearing-in ceremony today. Congratulations to the Australian people on your new PM that isn't Tony Abbott - judging from /r/Australia, who must have equivalent of Satan unbound on the mortal realms. However, it does leave the impression that Australia is toppling PMs at a rate slower only when compared to an Ancient Roman gladiatorial contest.

Ave Rome.

Darkshaunz is Twelve's Senior Political Correspondent. He doesn't even fucking live in Australia, but graduated from the UNSC School for International Relations specializing in wikipedia entries and fridge units on the sidewalk that distribute internet to people's homes. The views presented here are an expert opinion bordering on actual facts and should be cited whenever possible.
cailo-
I think politics don't matter so much in a lucky country such as Australia as the complex, inefficient, and inflexible regulatory mechanisms continue to restrain innovation but also extremism. At worst a few people might loose their jobs and we might have to pay more for some things, its not like any Australian Prime Minister can declare war on New Zealand or anything.

Still I have felt compelled to watch the goings on today. Malcolm Turnbull has been seen as a intelligent and savvy individual, but I think power has a corrupting effect on him as it brings out his bad qualities such as his inflated ego. I think he serves better in a support role rather than a leading role but I am interested in seeing the experiment of a Turnbull run government.
Darkshaunz
Apple iStylus

Recently, I watched a video which showed how much Steve Jobs hated the stylus. He made his low opinion of the stylus known during a Macworld 2007 presentation. This almost decade-old video presentation supposedly has bearing now, seeing as the new iPad Pro will have an Apple Pencil as an accessory. There are already plenty of parody videos out on youtube, including someone using a banana on their ipad and an endless stream of commentators stating, "Steve Jobs is rolling in his grave". I found this reaction to be a rather weak, A-HA! moment from various camps of peripheral users. As a prelude, I don't have much love or admiration for apple products myself, given that my last apple product that I found useful was an Apple iPod. I just dislike how Apple products require their own special little ecosystem and habitats in order to work properly. After all, if Engish is the lingua franca of the world, then the "PC" baseline is as close to a universal standard for technology we'll get.

Alright, it would be more accurate to say that the biggest problem with the Apple Pencil wouldn't just be the perceived betrayal of Steve Jobs' design philosophy. It would be the price point, USD $99. That's kind of steep for something that should come for free with the peripheral, but I'm not so sure people understand that the Apple Pencil is an optional accessory. Tech Crunch had a video up on youtube demonstrating how the Apple Pencil worked with the new iPad pro and he was saying stuff that was definitely not just the typical fanboy gushing. This is because in their stage presentation, Apple didn't explain to the viewers that the low latency and fast response times of the sensor pad with the Apple Pencil makes it an extremely competitive drawing tool. The stylus was marketed as an afterthought after they blew their load on their cover-cum-magnet-keyboard accessory. As a Wacom tablet user, I can tell you now that those kind of specs are definitely sought after by artists. The problem: Cintiq INTUOS drawing surfaces are extremely high-end and very expensive. They just facilitate the drawing, and lack all of the functions that the ipad offers.

Let's talk numbers. A Wacom CINTIQ line pen display peripheral for drawing starts at USD $799 and goes all the way up to USD $2,799. That's a phenomenal amount of money for just a drawing peripheral - and the cheapest, arguably weakest drawing surface from Wacom has the same price as the iPad Pro at USD $799. All but the artists that have sponsored drawing assists or big contracts will be seen using the $1,000 - $2,799 USD line of drawing surfaces. Don't forget that the pro offers apps, functions and other apple services that a mere drawing display surface does not. Then, we have the stylus itself - fair enough that the USD $99.00 price point has been described as steep. I agree, that's kind of expensive - regardless of the justification they provided with the "sensor accuracy" based inside the stylus. That particular kind of pressure detection technology has existed for many, many years already in existing tablet peripherals - and I believe the difference in pressure sensitivity could be debated as being negligible. Still, going back to Wacom - they are selling their styluses at USD$ 69.00. That's a whopping USD $30.00 cheaper than the Apple Pencil, yes, but the Wacom styluses aren't exactly utilizing 2015 sensor technology either. In fact, the Wacom line itself hasn't really innovated much over the years, because the market for drawing peripherals is still quite constrained and niche.

Personally, I applaud Apple for the design mutuality they applied for the ipad pro and the apple pencil. Even with USD $100 tacked on top of their USD $800 surface tablet, it still gives budding and aspiring artists/sketchers a chance at using a professional-grade surface with fast response times, low latency and greater mobility due to its agile mobile processor. Apple has always been viewed as the prodigy of form-factor design in the technosphere, but people forget that it's their lineage and origin as a software application pioneer that keeps them competitive. The art community never really had any alternatives beyond the Wacom offerings, but now Apple has opened new doors for more freelance artists and colourists to compete and express themselves artistically for a fraction of the price that the current market giant has been commanding. Introducing the Apple Pencil and the all-in-one surface peripheral in the new generation of ipad will undoubtedly force Wacom into stepping up its game, or pricing their monstrous, clunky and outdated pen displays more reasonably.

That's a good thing for everybody involved.
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