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Docilus


The first mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt wrote:
The New Horizons mission will help us understand worlds at the edge of our solar system by making the first reconnaissance of the Pluto system and by venturing deeper into the distant, mysterious Kuiper Belt – a relic of solar system formation.
New Horizons launched on January 19, 2006; it swung past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February 2007, and will conduct a six-month-long reconnaissance flyby study of Pluto and its moons starting over the next couple of days.

What We Know

Further Reading

If you are feeling crafty, follow this link to download model making plans.
Hunterbob
Isn't it crazy, that we can launch a probe to accurately reach its destination in nine years with a stopover for photos of Jupiter? That's a lot of calculating variables.
Fork
Good stuff, can't wait for some sweet photos!

That first video stunk like bro-marketing though. It had classical music transitioning to a dubstep drop, slowmo-quickmo, using words like "tricked out" and shit. It kind of annoys/disgusts me, but I guess if that's what they have to do to appeal to this younger generation it's a necessary evil.
Darkshaunz
Fork wrote:
what they have to do to appeal to this younger generation it's a necessary evil.


Very few people are interested in outer space these days. I mean it when I say that.

None of my co-workers can even name half the planets in our solar system. I wouldn't count them as the "younger generation", but even from people within my age group - there is a very real disconnect between being curious about space. It most likely gets even worse as you move to the generation or two ahead of our demographic.

I think society has become very inward-looking, especially with this new selfie culture, and documenting everything they do to for the internet. This is what interests people, rather than reading about why the fuck it's awesome that the sun has solar prominences that are the size of four earths stacked on top of each other. Or other very cool things to know, like the fact that the infamous Eagle Head Nebula (Pillars of Creation) was decimated by a wavefront from a supernova thousands of years ago - except we can still see it because light from the nebula takes 7,000 years to reach us. We can still see it alive and birthing stars, like a time machine - even though that thing was destroyed ages ago.

So much cool goddamned shit in space, and all anyone cares about was what vapid filter some jack-off celebrity used on instagram.
Hunterbob
Darkshaunz wrote:
Fork wrote:
what they have to do to appeal to this younger generation it's a necessary evil.


Very few people are interested in outer space these days. I mean it when I say that.

None of my co-workers can even name half the planets in our solar system. I wouldn't count them as the "younger generation", but even from people within my age group - there is a very real disconnect between being curious about space. It most likely gets even worse as you move to the generation or two ahead of our demographic.

I think society has become very inward-looking, especially with this new selfie culture, and documenting everything they do to for the internet. This is what interests people, rather than reading about why the fuck it's awesome that the sun has solar prominences that are the size of four earths stacked on top of each other. Or other very cool things to know, like the fact that the infamous Eagle Head Nebula (Pillars of Creation) was decimated by a wavefront from a supernova thousands of years ago - except we can still see it because light from the nebula takes 7,000 years to reach us. We can still see it alive and birthing stars, like a time machine - even though that thing was destroyed ages ago.

So much cool goddamned shit in space, and all anyone cares about was what vapid filter some jack-off celebrity used on instagram.

That's a brilliant summary.

I do have to disagree on the generational thing. I think our parents and grandparents are the prime generation for interest in the cosmos, as they were alive to see the Great Space Race in all its glory.

They also had the original Star Trek and Battlestar Glactica tv series, as well as Star Wars.

My mum bought me and my brother a book of star charts, which I still remember some things from, and it was pretty awesome seeing the stars for the first time in the Northern Hemisphere, recognising these constellations, that looked nothing like they did on paper.

I'll always have an awe for space, and I plan on passing that on to my kids one day.
Docilus
July 4, 2015 wrote:
The New Horizons spacecraft experienced an anomaly this afternoon that led to a loss of communication with Earth. Communication has since been reestablished and the spacecraft is healthy.

The mission operations center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, lost contact with the unmanned spacecraft -- now 10 days from arrival at Pluto -- at 1:54 p.m. EDT, and regained communications with New Horizons at 3:15 p.m. EDT, through NASA’s Deep Space Network.

During that time the autonomous autopilot on board the spacecraft recognized a problem and – as it’s programmed to do in such a situation – switched from the main to the backup computer. The autopilot placed the spacecraft in “safe mode,” and commanded the backup computer to reinitiate communication with Earth. New Horizons then began to transmit telemetry to help engineers diagnose the problem.

Status updates will be issued as new information is available.


Gets all the way there, then breaks down.

I'm not saying aliens.., but aliens.
Spoon
Docilus wrote:
NASA’s Deep Space Network.

sounds awesome

Docilus wrote:
The autopilot placed the spacecraft in “safe mode,”

exactly what I would have suggested
Darkshaunz
Image

The human race sends our first greeting card, in the form of the New Horizons probe - to an interplanetary family member in the far reaches of our solar system.

Our messenger delivered our apologies for demoting it to a "dwarf planet" and also our first warm hellos from a bunch of bipedal organisms located a cool 7 billion kilometers away.

Hello Pluto, and farewell (for now)!

PS: <3
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