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Hunterbob
Fun wrote:
The 'graduate' positions I see listed online requiring 2 years of experience are always somewhat baffling.

Basically they're looking for someone they can pay as a grad but who finished their degree 2 years ago.

I've never quite figured this one out either. Either you want a graduate, or you want slave/cheap labour with experience (not really a graduate, so much as part of the work force).
kiral
cailo- wrote:
I finished my degree at the end of 2013 and since then I have been looking for work with out success. I still think doing my degree was worth it.

For most of the time since I finished high school in 1998 I have been looking for work. It got to the point where I didn't know what to apply for any more. I thought an accounting degree would be a sure thing to get me work. What I found though is that every job that is advertised on seek.com requires a lot of work experience or a level of achievement in university only obtained by the top 5% for you to stand out against the other 250 people who applied for that job who are in the exact same boat as you are. I now think that the best way to get a job is more about who you know not what you know, and being the son of a plumber my family can't help me much to help me find that accounting job. Still with out that piece of paper I would be back in that position I used to be in. I think its better to be able to apply for work and not get the job than to be in no position to apply for any work what so every. I suppose applying for work can be tiresome but a degree can be a source of hope that some day you might be able to get that better life you deserve.

If you can get that job that you want with out a degree I say go for it. Degrees are a dime a dozen, they don't guarantee you a job and they are a lot of hard work. Still, there are plenty of reasons to want to get a degree.


Honestly there are heaps of ways to get experience, especially with an accounting degree. You could even do the accounting for your dad's plumbing, it's shit like that employers are looking for in entry level positions.
Fun
Hunterbob wrote:
Fun wrote:
The 'graduate' positions I see listed online requiring 2 years of experience are always somewhat baffling.

Basically they're looking for someone they can pay as a grad but who finished their degree 2 years ago.

I've never quite figured this one out either. Either you want a graduate, or you want slave/cheap labour with experience (not really a graduate, so much as part of the work force).


Image
cailo-
kiral wrote:
Honestly there are heaps of ways to get experience, especially with an accounting degree. You could even do the accounting for your dad's plumbing, it's shit like that employers are looking for in entry level positions.


Oh I am able to do a little bit and its on the resume, but I lack the knowledge to do it all. I'd be interested to hear about other ways to get experience.
Hunterbob
cailo- wrote:
kiral wrote:
Honestly there are heaps of ways to get experience, especially with an accounting degree. You could even do the accounting for your dad's plumbing, it's shit like that employers are looking for in entry level positions.


Oh I am able to do a little bit and its on the resume, but I lack the knowledge to do it all. I'd be interested to hear about other ways to get experience.

Learn advanced excel.

My friend who does accountancy says that excel is the backbone to her job and that she's pretty average with arithmetic.
kiral
The secret when first getting a job is to lie about your experience, just a bit.

If you lie about things you know you can do, but don't have the experience to demonstrate I think it's perfectly acceptable. Also everyone else does it, so it's just accepted these days.
Shrewmkin
I know for IT you don't really need to head into the university route, you usually can pay for an exam you sit for and bam you are microsoft certified or have your CCNA cert. There is probably similar short cuts in the area you want to get into it just comes down to research.

Also as what others have mentioned prior, been well connected with people can get you a job, especially when they can vouch for you when an opening position in their area/work.occurs.
kiral
Shrewmkin wrote:
I know for IT you don't really need to head into the university route, you usually can pay for an exam you sit for and bam you are microsoft certified or have your CCNA cert. There is probably similar short cuts in the area you want to get into it just comes down to research.

Also as what others have mentioned prior, been well connected with people can get you a job, especially when they can vouch for you when an opening position in their area/work.occurs.


Pretty sure those certifications don't mean shit anymore, and they're just a way to milk money out of large organisations.

With IT if you don't have a degree, you've got to at least demonstrate some self motivation and create your own projects. If anyone is looking to get into development side of IT, maintaining an active github account with a few personal projects helps a shitload.
Melg
kiral wrote:
Seylana wrote:
I wish I didnt do the degree I did as Im finding now its not what I want to do at all. I did a Bachelor of Fine Art and if I wanted to do any other kind of job in the design/art sphere I would have to go back and do further study of some kind. Yeah I have a degree but all the jobs Ive had have been in hospitality since I was 17.


I've honestly never met anyone who has put a fine arts degree to use.

With University I think it comes down to what type of degree you chose. Generally people who chose an arts degree never actually use it. Doing a business degree is just as generic, yet it can be applied to a shit load of jobs.


I dont agree. Arts and Fine Art is not the same. My degree teaches you how to perfect your practice and become an artist for a living basically. That alone I could do, or I could take that degree and do one or two years of further study and apply it to any multitude of jobs. Its just that I dont want to be an artist.

I hate that people lump any kind of "art" degree into the same pile when they are not the same at all. I know for a fact that my degree has about 4 times more work and contact hours than any Arts degree.
kiral
Seylana wrote:
kiral wrote:
Seylana wrote:
I wish I didnt do the degree I did as Im finding now its not what I want to do at all. I did a Bachelor of Fine Art and if I wanted to do any other kind of job in the design/art sphere I would have to go back and do further study of some kind. Yeah I have a degree but all the jobs Ive had have been in hospitality since I was 17.


I've honestly never met anyone who has put a fine arts degree to use.

With University I think it comes down to what type of degree you chose. Generally people who chose an arts degree never actually use it. Doing a business degree is just as generic, yet it can be applied to a shit load of jobs.


I dont agree. Arts and Fine Art is not the same. My degree teaches you how to perfect your practice and become an artist for a living basically. That alone I could do, or I could take that degree and do one or two years of further study and apply it to any multitude of jobs. Its just that I dont want to be an artist.

I hate that people lump any kind of "art" degree into the same pile when they are not the same at all. I know for a fact that my degree has about 4 times more work and contact hours than any Arts degree.


No shit. I was referring to both fine arts and arts degrees separately.
Melg
kiral wrote:
I've honestly never met anyone who has put a fine arts degree to use.

With University I think it comes down to what type of degree you chose. Generally people who chose an arts degree never actually use it. Doing a business degree is just as generic, yet it can be applied to a shit load of jobs.


Seems you are casting them both with the same shit stick to me.
moss
This is a topic that comes up quite often of late.

I feel the greatest benefit from a university degree is the analytical and critical thinking skills you are "meant" to develop.

As to whether or not a degree is "useful/required"? Well it really depends on what profession you wish to enter. There a many professions which require a degree as an entry point towards professional membership. Solicitors & Accountants are prime examples of this.

Obviously anything in the medical professions it is mandatory to hold a degree. Public service in most professional occupations require a degree, it isn't really optional.

That said though, experience should trump education. What many neglect to consider is that having both is the real winning hand. You don't have to choose one over the other, you can have both, many of us undoubtedly do.

I've seen some bagging on arts degrees here which probably does stem from the idea that an arts degree doesn't get you a job. Which honestly is a pretty fair call. Outside of social services an arts degree isn't worth much unless you specialised from the beginning knowing what you wanted to do with it.

It can however be a ticket into a post grad course which WILL get you a some real skills and job prospects.

On the other hand if you wanted to work in real estate, finance(sales), insurance etc you don't "need" a degree. You can do industry training courses through KAPLAN etc which is fine and you'd be making decent money in no time. There a plenty of people who do this, and really in these industries, especially in Sydney "who you know" becomes a big part of how easy it is to get your foot in the door.

Hope my input helps.
Fun
Seylana wrote:
kiral wrote:
I've honestly never met anyone who has put a fine arts degree to use.

With University I think it comes down to what type of degree you chose. Generally people who chose an arts degree never actually use it. Doing a business degree is just as generic, yet it can be applied to a shit load of jobs.


Seems you are casting them both with the same shit stick to me.


One was an anecdote, the other a generalisation? Both probably accurate, at least in his experience.

Can't imagine there are a lot of Fine Arts jobs kicking around, and if they're just teaching you how to be an artist I'd be totally amazed if there were a bunch of cashed up artists running around paying off their HECS debt.
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