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Office Drone Hive 2015

Consider Frustoconical Ladders

Spoon
Jiminy wrote:
So a nipple could be described as a frustum?

Well that would depend on how you define the base. A breast isn't a detached entity so I'm sure it could be argued it doesn't meet the requirements. Also you'd generally hope the breast wouldn't be conical unless we're talking 90s Madonna.
Jiminy
Spoon wrote:
Jiminy wrote:
So a nipple could be described as a frustum?

Well that would depend on how you define the base. A breast isn't a detached entity so I'm sure it could be argued it doesn't meet the requirements. Also you'd generally hope the breast wouldn't be conical unless we're talking 90s Madonna.


I said the nipple bro. Not the areola and not the breast at large, just the nip. So the base of the nipple would be where it meets the areola. At least that's how I picture it.
Spoon
How is everyone's droning going lately?

I'm currently preparing for an audit on our Information Security Management System next week (from an independent 3rd party) as mandated by our industry's regulatory body. The ISMS is a project I've been working on for over a year and have been in charge of disseminating all relevant information to every member of staff over the last few months.

These policies account for 22 documents and around 400 pages (printed a whole ream of paper for a physical copy of this bad boy) and ensuring they meet every requirement on an extensive audit checklist is...tedious.

I think once this is done I'll be quite happy and I'll be a real Information Security Officer, woo! That should look good on the ole resume.
Fork
I'm just droning along, singing a song, droning in a spring wonderland.

As mentioned on Slack, as long as I'm making money and can pay the bills I'm happy.

I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.
Hunterbob
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.
kiral
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(
Hunterbob
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(

Yeah, that's something I've noticed, too and I know I won't mind it up until a certain extent, which is why I'd hate to be at a high level that's always go. I'd be happy to be around the upper-middle level and get a nice salary.
kiral
Hunterbob wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(

Yeah, that's something I've noticed, too and I know I won't mind it up until a certain extent, which is why I'd hate to be at a high level that's always go. I'd be happy to be around the upper-middle level and get a nice salary.


Yeah CEOs of large companies are pretty much working 100% of the time. That doesn't sound very fun.
cailo-
Small businesses have to take their work home too. My father is a plumber and I've grown up seeing him work all day they do book work for a few hours when he gets home. Its put me off from owning my own business.
Spoon
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(

Yeah, that's something I've noticed, too and I know I won't mind it up until a certain extent, which is why I'd hate to be at a high level that's always go. I'd be happy to be around the upper-middle level and get a nice salary.


Yeah CEOs of large companies are pretty much working 100% of the time. That doesn't sound very fun.

Being the CEO of a decent sized company is all-engrossing. The company IS your life.

Fuck that in all possible ways.
kiral
Spoon wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(

Yeah, that's something I've noticed, too and I know I won't mind it up until a certain extent, which is why I'd hate to be at a high level that's always go. I'd be happy to be around the upper-middle level and get a nice salary.


Yeah CEOs of large companies are pretty much working 100% of the time. That doesn't sound very fun.

Being the CEO of a decent sized company is all-engrossing. The company IS your life.

Fuck that in all possible ways.


I've thought about it before. There must be a sweet spot between salary, and % of time spent working.
Fork
kiral wrote:
Spoon wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(

Yeah, that's something I've noticed, too and I know I won't mind it up until a certain extent, which is why I'd hate to be at a high level that's always go. I'd be happy to be around the upper-middle level and get a nice salary.


Yeah CEOs of large companies are pretty much working 100% of the time. That doesn't sound very fun.

Being the CEO of a decent sized company is all-engrossing. The company IS your life.

Fuck that in all possible ways.


I've thought about it before. There must be a sweet spot between salary, and % of time spent working.

I think one way to achieve this comes with longevity in a job/role.

Hopefully you can stay there long enough for the pay rises to make it a decent wage after a while, but still be in a decent position at the company so you're not a shit kicker but also not having too much responsibility..
kiral
Fork wrote:
kiral wrote:
Spoon wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(

Yeah, that's something I've noticed, too and I know I won't mind it up until a certain extent, which is why I'd hate to be at a high level that's always go. I'd be happy to be around the upper-middle level and get a nice salary.


Yeah CEOs of large companies are pretty much working 100% of the time. That doesn't sound very fun.

Being the CEO of a decent sized company is all-engrossing. The company IS your life.

Fuck that in all possible ways.


I've thought about it before. There must be a sweet spot between salary, and % of time spent working.

I think one way to achieve this comes with longevity in a job/role.

Hopefully you can stay there long enough for the pay rises to make it a decent wage after a while, but still be in a decent position at the company so you're not a shit kicker but also not having too much responsibility..


The issue with that is it would become incredibly boring if you're stuck in the same role for such a long time.
Hunterbob
kiral wrote:
Fork wrote:
kiral wrote:
Spoon wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
kiral wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Fork wrote:
I work to live, not live to work. I like the fact that generally after work I can forget about it and enjoy my life.

This is important for me, I don't like taking work home with me at all and don't really like talking about work unless I'm there.


The more senior your role gets, the less this is possible unfortunately :(

Yeah, that's something I've noticed, too and I know I won't mind it up until a certain extent, which is why I'd hate to be at a high level that's always go. I'd be happy to be around the upper-middle level and get a nice salary.


Yeah CEOs of large companies are pretty much working 100% of the time. That doesn't sound very fun.

Being the CEO of a decent sized company is all-engrossing. The company IS your life.

Fuck that in all possible ways.


I've thought about it before. There must be a sweet spot between salary, and % of time spent working.

I think one way to achieve this comes with longevity in a job/role.

Hopefully you can stay there long enough for the pay rises to make it a decent wage after a while, but still be in a decent position at the company so you're not a shit kicker but also not having too much responsibility..


The issue with that is it would become incredibly boring if you're stuck in the same role for such a long time.

Unless the role varies over time, for instance here it's project based, so when this project wraps up in two years, I'd move onto another project with different (and probably a lot of similar) tasks. If I'm still here of course...
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