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Pretty well made and interesting video - I wish he expanded on a bunch of them though.

Also it's between the 45th-49th brightest star in the night, if you count the sun - WHICH YOU SHOULD.
Shrill
Also it's between the 45th-49th brightest star in the night, if you count the sun - WHICH YOU SHOULD.

As soon as I see it in the night, I will add it to the list. Until then I refuse to count it.
Malieus
Shrill wrote:
Also it's between the 45th-49th brightest star in the night, if you count the sun - WHICH YOU SHOULD.

As soon as I see it in the night, I will add it to the list. Until then I refuse to count it.



Or you know you could listen to the scientific fact that, 'stars' are big balls of nuclear fission, and our 'sun' is a big ball of nuclear fission.… maybe they are related and able to be placed under some kind of general label. what is that called in English, a noun?. Oh look it seems there is already a word for them.… STARS!

And when you look at the sky at night you are looking through the atmosphere out into space and you might see stars. (Depending on light pollution.) During the 'day' you are doing the exact same thing except one of those stars is so close that the light it projects is refracted of the atmosphere causing you to see a colour depending on the angles involved and the cones in your eye. Making it impossible to see past our home star, the Sun. (think of it like a doctor shining a torch in your eyes, it is really hard to see behind him unless the light behind is more powerful.) So in effect night and day are the same thing all that changes is which way your section of the earth is facing. (At the doctors light or away from it.) If we had no atmosphere (not only would we be dead) but we could see star's easier when looking at 'the Sun', the light refraction would be minimal.
Shrill
I know the Sun is a star. But as long as we define night as 'the time we cannot see the sun', I cannot count the Sun as a star in the night sky.

You are arguing for counting it as a star in the sky, or a visible star, which are both totally valid. And it should cound in luminosity arguments about visible stars, stars in the sky, etc. But when someone uses the subset of all stars - stars in the night sky, it can never be counted.
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