Sign up
Darkshaunz
Hey Silver, I didn't know you were a stargazer too!

ISON has been spectacular so far. Not just because it's a beautiful sight, but mostly because it came from a long way - specifically the Oort cloud (about 1 LY away). We are mostly used to seeing periodical comets from the Kuiper Belt (ie: Halley's Comet), which is just outside the reach of Neptune.

If it reaches the sun without disintegrating, that would be even better! Nobody is quite sure what will happen to ISON when it approaches the sun, according to planetary.org - ISON's nucleus could be breaking apart. Stargazing communities expect more great pictures as it approaches the sun, and it will more visible than Venus to the naked eye in the northern skies.

Image
Source: Waldemar Skorupa
SilverClaw
Darkshaunz wrote:
Hey Silver, I didn't know you were a stargazer too!
It's quite an addictive hobby really. It's one of those rare situations where the more you look into a specific topic, the more information and knowledge you acquire, there's this exponential growth of questions that arise as you travel down the rabbit hole that is the known universe.

We live in such an amazing time. I'm often asked by my father why I don't get a telescope and the simple answer is I don't need one. I have access to public real-time images and video from telescopes that are literally millions of kms above our heads. Though NASA does sometimes censor said images but that's a different story.
Just the other day I witnessed a sunshot do something I've never seen before.
Darkshaunz wrote:
ISON has been spectacular so far. Not just because it's a beautiful sight, but mostly because it came from a long way - specifically the Oort cloud (about 1 LY away). We are mostly used to seeing periodical comets from the Kuiper Belt (ie: Halley's Comet), which is just outside the reach of Neptune.

If it reaches the sun without disintegrating, that would be even better! Nobody is quite sure what will happen to ISON when it approaches the sun, according to planetary.org - ISON's nucleus could be breaking apart. Stargazing communities expect more great pictures as it approaches the sun, and it will more visible than Venus to the naked eye in the northern skies.

Image
Source: Waldemar Skorupa

Lets hope Ison follows in the footsteps of comet Lovejoy which amazingly survived through perihelion.

Image
comet Lovejoy impacted by a CME on approach to the Sun

Suppose I should add some interesting science to this thread.
Ice ages and galactic years

For those of you that require visual aid.

Jiminy
SilverClaw wrote:
I have access to public real-time images and video from telescopes that are literally millions of kms above our heads.


Which telescope is that?
SilverClaw
Jiminy wrote:
SilverClaw wrote:
I have access to public real-time images and video from telescopes that are literally millions of kms above our heads.


Which telescope is that?
There are heaps that share public data. You just need to know where to look.

Here's an example from IRIS which was just recently launched and the images are stunning.

The video is of sunspot 1899 on the 19th of Nov, It was about three times the size of Earth. Not sure why it's not colourized.

Tooheys
The speed the comet would have picked up after going around the sun would have been huge!
Post Reply