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Hunterbob
I didn't really know where to put this video, but figured this could possibly become a cool thread for sciencey/experiement videos and articles.

To kick it off, I just saw this great video of how water reacts when wrung from a towel in space (on the ISS):
Hunterbob
TIME LAPSE MAP OF EVERY NUCLEAR EXPLOSION EVER ON EARTH

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project’s “Trinity” test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea’s two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear).

Each nation gets a blip and a flashing dot on the map whenever they detonate a nuclear weapon, with a running tally kept on the top and bottom bars of the screen. Hashimoto, who began the project in 2003, says that he created it with the goal of showing”the fear and folly of nuclear weapons.” It starts really slow — if you want to see real action, skip ahead to 1962 or so — but the buildup becomes overwhelming.




It's a long video, but it's a very interesting and somewhat unnerving watch.

source (direct copy pasta)
Darkshaunz
A sombre, and dark 7 minute symphony of mankind's scientific and militaristic perverseness. I think it's a simple, yet powerful video that should be shown to people, especially those in education.

The lull of bleeps and bloops when the timer hits 1993 does make you go, "At least someone, somewhere, finally realized the madness of it all". The dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1989 certainly helped it along, no doubt.

In hindsight - the cold war was exactly just that, cold. Furthermore, now in the year 2013 - we no longer class strong nations in terms of nuclear capability, but more on conventional power projection (seems like the sea is the "in" thing again) and economic competitiveness.

We're still in the business of killing each other, of course - but at least we are not doing it in a way that would make the next major asteroid say, "Fuck, I flew across the asteroid belt to land my ass in this barren, snowy and irradiated shithole? Where's my extinction event!? I am gonna rank Earth so poorly in galaxytripadvisor!".
Darkshaunz
Gunmetal wrote:
reckon any of those 2053 massive explosions may have damaged the environment?


The Earth has seen way more disastrous afflictions in its modest four and a half billion years of existence. Evolved humanity, by comparison - has only existed for about two hundred thousand years. In other words, the nuclear explosions will ultimately only serve to harm the species that initiated them. Mother nature has withstood supervolcanic eruptions that put our biggest hydrogen bombs to shame, conjured plate tectonics that gave birth to entire mountain ranges, and weathered asteroid bombardments so severe that it made our early homeworld look like a red, flaming, pock-marked dread planet.

Ninety nine percent of every species that have ever existed, have gone extinct - via a series of mass extinction events. Our beautiful pale blue dot will be fine, it will regenerate itself, it will reshape itself, and it will dance the elliptical tango alongside our Sun until the end of our solar system. The worries and lamentations of our planet is mostly born out of the hubris of the homo sapiens species. We worry for the planet, but in actuality - we're mostly worried about ourselves. We, well-intentioned or not, elevated ourselves to the role of "Earth's caretaker", when we can't even look after ourselves.

So yes, the tests have damaged the environment conducive to our habitation. But ultimately not enough for our Earth to give a fuck.
Jiminy
Darkshaunz wrote:
Gunmetal wrote:
reckon any of those 2053 massive explosions may have damaged the environment?


The Earth has seen way more disastrous afflictions in its modest four and a half billion years of existence. Evolved humanity, by comparison - has only existed for about two hundred thousand years. In other words, the nuclear explosions will ultimately only serve to harm the species that initiated them. Mother nature has withstood supervolcanic eruptions that put our biggest hydrogen bombs to shame, conjured plate tectonics that gave birth to entire mountain ranges, and weathered asteroid bombardments so severe that it made our early homeworld look like a red, flaming, pock-marked dread planet.

Ninety nine percent of every species that have ever existed, have gone extinct - via a series of mass extinction events. Our beautiful pale blue dot will be fine, it will regenerate itself, it will reshape itself, and it will dance the elliptical tango alongside our Sun until the end of our solar system. The worries and lamentations of our planet is mostly born out of the hubris of the homo sapiens species. We worry for the planet, but in actuality - we're mostly worried about ourselves. We, well-intentioned or not, elevated ourselves to the role of "Earth's caretaker", when we can't even look after ourselves.

So yes, the tests have damaged the environment conducive to our habitation. But ultimately not enough for our Earth to give a fuck.


My exact sentiments.
Darkshaunz
Fork wrote:
Shaunz, that was beautiful.


Thank you Forkeh. I think it's even more beautiful that someone could read that and appreciate it.

Deep down, I believe people are actually really intrigued by the natural world, and by the cosmic majesty of the universe. It is our Earthly trappings and distractions that keep us looking down at the muck of what humanity's existence is supposed to be. Bound by the gravity of modern day life, we forget that if you look up on a clear night's sky, you are looking at a real and living time machine display. Light from thousands of years ago, finally made it to Earth - and are now hitting the visual receptors of your eyeball. This light is then perceived and imaged by your brain. You are perceiving an ancient light beam from a star thousands of light years away from you, so you are directly interpreting a photonic timelapse using a series of electro-organic impulses, in real time.

In the Twelve Meet, when you guys are at the beach, crane your necks up, and just look at stars. Be amazed, because it is amazing. We have a fascination for the extraterrestrial, but yet - by chemical composition, we are deeply related to the universe. Carbon, nitrogen, helium, hydrogen and oxygen are the five most common elements in the universe. We are made of pretty much all of that (plus a little bit of others, of course!) - so we are, and I mean "we" in an Earth-bound organism sense, are part of a huge galactic community. The most alien thing about being human is that we've stopped being curious about space as a civilization.
Spoon
Darkshaunz wrote:
In the Twelve Meet, when you guys are at the beach, crane your necks up, and just look at stars. Be amazed, because it is amazing.


LOL If we are at the beach then it will be day time so if we look up we will just see a clear blue sky so the stars will actually be DOWN because that's where they go on the side of the earth that has night time
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