Sign up
Bain
Another series worth picking up is The Abhorsen Trilogy.

Sabriel
Lirael
Abhorsen
Clariel: The lost Abhorsen (just found out about this while searching for the names in the series! Due 2014)

The series ties itself up nicely and I believe the 2014 book is a separate piece.

Also, The Sovereign Stone Trilogy would be another one to pick up. It's got a pretty dark story line.
Fork
What's the one you were talking about when you were in Perth, Bain?

And Doc, end up remembering the title of the amazing book you forgot about?

I'm thinking of reading The Way of Kings next..
hekate
I recently read I, Claudius by Robert Graves (and the sequel, Claudius the God).

Image


It's a fictional autobiography of the Emperor Claudius, and covers his life from the reign of Augustus, to his becoming emperor on the death of Caligula. The autobiographical perspective works really well, as it hints the unreliability of the narrator (especially so in Claudius the God) while making both Claudius and the other historical figures more engaging.

Amazon blurb wrote:
Bringing to life the subterfuge and double-dealing of Roman nobility, Robert Graves' "I, Claudius" brings the ancient world to life with startling clarity and meticulous realism. This "Penguin Modern Classics" edition is a includes an introduction by Barry Unsworth.
Despised for his weakness and regarded by his family as little more than a stammering fool, the nobleman Claudius quietly survives the intrigues, bloody purges and mounting cruelty of the imperial Roman dynasties. In "I, Claudius" he watches from the sidelines to record the reigns of its emperors: from the wise Augustus and his villainous wife Livia to the sadistic Tiberius and the insane excesses of Caligula. Written in the form of Claudius' autobiography, this is the first part of Robert Graves' brilliant account of the madness and debauchery of ancient Rome, and stands as one of the most celebrated, gripping historical novels ever written.
Robert Ranke Graves (1895-1985) was a British poet, novelist, and critic. He is best known for the historical novel "I, Claudius" and the critical study of myth and poetry "The White Goddess". His autobiography, "Goodbye to All That", was published in 1929, quickly establishing itself as a modern classic. Graves also translated Apuleius, Lucan and Suetonius for the "Penguin Classics", and compiled the first modern dictionary of Greek Mythology, "The Greek Myths".


Reading these two books has prompted me to go back and reread Graves' translation of Suetonius' The Twelve Caesars, which I read bits of years ago at uni, and which was a major source for Graves' novels. It's been interesting comparing the fictional Claudius and his perspectives with the opinions presented by Suetonius.
Jiminy
retsgip wrote:


I like the "I like to be held in suspense, preferably for years at a time" --> Game of thrones. And "five or six books enough for you?" --> "No, I shall require at least ten"

Also I don't think I would recommend LOTR to someone new to fantasy. That shit was difficult to read.
Fork
That looks pretty damn hardcore, Hekate.

I've started reading The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson (who did the Mistborn series which I loved) and it's pretty sexy already.
hekate
retsgip wrote:
Just read all of these.
Image


I've only read 17 from that list:

1 The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1) by J.R.R. Tolkien
3 1984 by George Orwell
5 A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1) by George R.R. Martin
9 The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
11The Princess Bride by William Goldman
17 The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
18 Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke
19 Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
23 The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien
27 Assassin's Apprentice (Farseer Trilogy, #1) by Robin Hobb
35 The Mists of Avalon (The Mists of Avalon, #1) by Marion Zimmer Bradley
37 The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time, #1) by Robert Jordan
42 Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West (The Wicked Years, #1) by Gregory Maguire
49 The Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle, #1) by Patrick Rothfuss
51 The Once and Future King (The Once and Future King, #1-4) by T.H. White
60 The Eyre Affair (Thursday Next #1) by Jasper Fforde
78 Magician: Apprentice (The Riftwar Saga, #1) by Raymond E. Feist
retsgip
Nice. I actually grabbed most of these books and am looking to knock them out when I can. I always find big lists to be scary, but 100 isn't so bad.
Bain
Fork wrote:
What's the one you were talking about when you were in Perth, Bain?

And Doc, end up remembering the title of the amazing book you forgot about?

I'm thinking of reading The Way of Kings next..

I believe it's the Vlad Taltos series. Read them in chronological order, on the same lines of antihero as the night angel trilogy except the antihero is an assassin and kills for fun so long as there's coin in it for him.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Brust#Vlad_Taltos
Fork
13 novels :O And looks very confusing with different orders and shit to read them in :P

I'll add them to the list, The Way of Kings will keep me busy for a while.
Bain
Fork wrote:
13 novels :O And looks very confusing with different orders and shit to read them in :P

I'll add them to the list, The Way of Kings will keep me busy for a while.

Yeah, they aren't a tedious read like WoT series.

Each has more so flash backs of times gone and smaller continuum story arcs.
Post Reply