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Darkshaunz
Fork wrote:
Does one have a terminal velocity in space?


From what I understand about terminal velocity, it only applies if you are within the Earth's gravitational field. Therefore, it is a force affected by Earth's pull.

Once you achieve escape velocity from Earth, terminal velocity no longer applies - and you get a zero-g environment.
Docilus
Darkshaunz wrote:
From what I understand about terminal velocity, it only applies if you are within the Earth's gravitational field.


Not quite. replace 'Earth' with 'any'. You can still achieve terminal velocity on Mars, the Moon and in space.

Terminal Velocity is the point at which a falling object (subject to net force) reaches zero acceleration.
Jiminy
Shaunz is right but as Doc said, it would apply to any gravitational field rather than just Earth's. Although the term is only usually applied on Earth considering humans have rarely free fallen toward any other body.

If you were using it in deep space, where it doesn't apply because there is no gravitational pull from anything, you could say terminal velocity is the speed of light I suppose. But that's kind of the universal maximum velocity.
Hunterbob
Jiminy wrote:
If you were using it in deep space, where it doesn't apply because there is no gravitational pull from anything, you could say terminal velocity is the speed of light I suppose. But that's kind of the universal maximum velocity.

Prove it...
Jiminy
Hunterbob wrote:
Jiminy wrote:
If you were using it in deep space, where it doesn't apply because there is no gravitational pull from anything, you could say terminal velocity is the speed of light I suppose. But that's kind of the universal maximum velocity.

Prove it...


E=mc2
thorment
Jiminy wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Jiminy wrote:
If you were using it in deep space, where it doesn't apply because there is no gravitational pull from anything, you could say terminal velocity is the speed of light I suppose. But that's kind of the universal maximum velocity.

Prove it...


E=mc2


http://what-if.xkcd.com/28/
Hunterbob
Jiminy wrote:
Hunterbob wrote:
Jiminy wrote:
If you were using it in deep space, where it doesn't apply because there is no gravitational pull from anything, you could say terminal velocity is the speed of light I suppose. But that's kind of the universal maximum velocity.

Prove it...


E=mc2

That doesn't prove anything, that just demonstrates our current understanding. Science changes all the time, we don't know anything about FTL speeds, so they probably exist, but we don't know.
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